Meet Joe Easterly

Joe Easterly

Joe Easterly, Milne's Electronic Resources and Digital Scholarship Librarian

With Library service expanding deeper into the realm of digital scholarship – the new Digital Media Lab, open-source publishing, Digital Thoreau, etc. — could a matching librarian be far behind? Of course not, and he has arrived in the person of Joe Easterly, who became Milne’s first Electronic Resources and Digital Scholarship Librarian on October 24.

Joe is here to act as the primary human resource for faculty and students working on (or hoping to begin) scholarly projects with a digital focus. It’s what he’s been doing, more or less, at the University of Buffalo for the last four years where he was a media specialist and coordinator of the Media Resource Center, serving as the Visual Resources librarian to the university’s visual arts faculty. The skills he’s acquired through his coursework (he earned his master’s degree in library science in 2007, with an emphasis in digital media information systems and retrieval) and professional experience will serve him – or, more accurately, the Geneseo campus community – very well.

Among the projects Joe has been involved in is UBdigit, the University of Buffalo’s digital library collection. He managed and directed the Visual Resources Collection portion of that resource, from scanning the images to creating the metadata, working closely with faculty and supervising a team of student assistants. Joe is used to collaborating with faculty, having conducted workshops, developed image digitization standards, facilitated licensing and consignment of digital images, and helped write grants. He also has experience digitizing images for exhibitions and scholarly publication, and he’s done digital preservation consulting for UB Galleries and museum curators in the Buffalo-Niagara region. He was a charter member of UB’s Digital Humanities Initiative. Safe to say, Joe knows his way around the digital scholarship landscape and is prepared to lead others through it.

One of the first projects Joe has joined here at Geneseo is the Digital Thoreau Project, headed by English professor Paul Schacht and other faculty from the English department and Milne Library. Digital Thoreau aims to bring the works of Henry David Thoreau – beginning with a TEI-encoded scholarly edition of Walden – to scholars, students and general readers around the world.

Joe’s ease and expertise with digital technology and his commitment to librarianship are built on a solid humanities foundation. He received a BA in linguistics, has studied French extensively and is currently pursuing a second master’s degree in social anthropology. He is also a classically trained pianist. Lately, he says, he’s “really into” wine and photography, and when the weather’s fine he likes to go sailing.

The folks at Milne are very glad that Joe decided to join the faculty, and the feeling is mutual, he says. “I was really impressed by how committed and talented the library faculty and staff are … it was a big motivation for me to join.” Aesthetics played a (small) part, too, in his decision to come to Geneseo. “I was expecting the dreary early-70s late modernist architecture you sometimes see at [SUNY] campuses,” he says. “I had no idea how beautiful the town is, or the campus, until I came to visit.” Joe is not the only one who is optimistic about his future here at Geneseo, and about the future of digital scholarship.

Resources for Education Majors

Public Libraries can be a great resource for Geneseo education students looking for material to supplement lesson plans.  Their collections include picture books, classics, chapter books and non fiction material, and a youth services librarian can often provide lists of material grouped by subject.  For example, if you needed fiction books about outer space for various grade levels, a librarian could provide you with a list of appropriate books.  Below, books about outer space are arranged into three categories:  picture books (for the youngest readers), easy reads (for early grade schoolers) and chapter books (for older children/young teens).
Outer Space Stencils by The Bunny Maker provided by the Flickr Creative Commons Image Search

Outer Space Stencils by The Bunny Maker provided by the Flickr Creative Commons Image Search

Picture Books about Space (Young Children)

Stella to Earth by Simon Puttock

Astronauts are Sleeping by Natalie Standiford
While spinning through space, three astronauts dream of life on earth.

Stella to Earth by Simon Puttock
Before Stella’s father comes in to tell her a bedtime story, Stella takes a little trip in a spaceship.

Hare and Tortoise Race to the Moon by Oliver J. Corwin
Best friends Tortoise and Hare compete to see who will be first to reach the moon.

Harry and Horsie by Katie Van Camp
Harry sneaks out of bed one night with his best friend, Horsie. Bubbles fill Harry’s room and begin carrying items into space. Can Harry find Horsie?

I’ll Catch the Moon by Nina Crews
A child imagines going into outer space, catching the moon, and taking it on an around-the-world adventure.

Joey and Jet in Space by James Yang
When Jet runs away, he could be anywhere, maybe even outer space.

Moon Ball by Jane Yolen


Moon Ball
 by Jane Yolen

Danny always strikes out, but in a dream he plays baseball with the moon and stars and finds it an eminently satisfying experience.

Space Boy by Leo Landry
Having decided not to go to bed because his home is too noisy, Nicholas flies his spaceship to the Moon, where he enjoys a snack, takes a moonwalk, and enjoys the quiet–until he realizes  what he is missing at home.

The Way Back Home by Oliver Jeffers
Stranded on the moon after his extraordinary airplane takes him into outer space, a boy meets a marooned young Martian with a broken spacecraft, and the two new friends work together to return to their respective homes.

Zoom! Zoom! Zoom! I’m off to the Moon by Dan Yaccarino
A boy gets in a spaceship and takes a dangerous but exciting trip to the moon.

Easy Reads about Space (Early Grade School)

Doodle Dog in Space by Eric Seltzer
Doodle Dog, a talented artist, comes to the rescue of his less artistic friends.

Let Me Off This Spaceship! by Gery Greer
When Tod and Billy are kidnapped by creatures from outer space, they try to make as much trouble as they can on board ship so that the spaceship captain will take them back to Earth.

Space Cat by Doug Cushman

Space Cat by Doug Cushman
When Space Cat and Earl the robot encounter trouble with their space ship, they crash-land on an alien planet to search for more fuel.

Space Guys! by Martha Weston
A boy is visited by beings that look like robots that arrive in a flying saucer from outer space.

Jed and the Space Bandits by Jean Marzollo
Jed’s Junior Space Patrol helps Molly, a girl who can turn invisible, to rescue her parents from bandits.

Alien & Possum: Friends No Matter What by Tony Johnston
Possum and Alien become friends and find that they have both similarities and differences.

Astronaut Piggy Wiggy by Christyan Fox
A little pig imagines what it would be like to be a daring astronaut.

Chapter Books about Space (Grade 5 & up)

Cosmic by Frank Cottrell Boyce
Super-sized, eleven-year-old Liam makes a giant leap for boy-kind by competing with a group of adults for the chance to go into space.

George’s Cosmic Treasure Hunt by Lucy Hawking
George is heartbroken when his neighbor Annie and her space-scientist father move to Florida, but when Annie sends him a secret message telling him she has been contacted by aliens with a terrible warning, he joins her in a galaxy-wide search for answers. Includes scientific essays on space travel.

Chilling with the Great Ones by Dan Greenburg


One Small Step
 by Philip Kerr

In 1969 Houston, Texas, thirteen-year-old Scott learns to fly from his father, an Air Force flight instructor, but when NASA needs him for a secret space mission, Scott’s elation is tempered by concern that his mother, who has moved to Florida, will find out.

Chilling with the Great Ones by Dan Greenburg
When siblings Klatu, Lek, and Ploo from the planet Loogl return to the mysterious Area 51 to recover their wrecked spaceship, they meet the Great Ones–four legendary Looglings who crashed in Roswell fifty years earlier. Klatu, Lek, and Ploo head back to Groom Lake to fix their busted spaceship. But the spaceship is gone–it’s been taken to Area 51. There’s nothing for the aliens to do other than sneak in and search for it. Instead they find something they weren’t looking for–the Great Ones! The mythic missing Looglians Org, Murkel, Shemp, and Kurth crashed at Roswell New Mexico in 1947, and have been in the deep freeze ever since. Can our three wacky alien kids rescue them?

I Left My Sneakers in Dimension X by Bruce Coville
Rod and his bratty cousin Elspeth are snatched into another dimension by the monstrous alien Smorkus Flinders.

The True Meaning of Smekday by Adam Rex

The True Meaning of Smekday by Adam Rex
When her mother is abducted by aliens on Christmas Eve (or “Smekday” Eve since the Boov Invasion), 11 year-old Tip hops in the family car and heads south to find her and meets an alien Boov mechanic who agrees to help her and save the planet from disaster.

The War of the Worlds by Chris Sasaki
An abridged version of H. G. Wells’ classic science fiction tale in which, as life on Mars becomes impossible, Martians and their terrifying machines invade the Earth.

Brandon Priddy

Brandon Priddy

-Brandon Priddy

*Image: Outer Space Stencils by The Bunny Maker provided by the Flickr Creative Commons Image Search

Some libraries reject Google’s offer to digitize book collections

On October 22, The New York Times ran a front page article about several large research libraries’ rejection of Google’s offer to scan and digitize large portions of their collections. The Boston Public Library, University of Connecticut and the University of Massachusetts are among several of New England’s largest libraries to refuse the offer.

Instead, many of these libraries are working with an organization called Open Content Alliance to make “…the material available to any search service…”, and not just limited to Google, who forbids libraries to make their collections available to other commercial search services when Google scans the materials.

Is this a mistake? Does it matter who is providing the service as long as patrons (aka students, faculty, staff) get the material they need? Or, as the refusing libraries counter, does this provide an alternative to Google and ensure that material is openly available and access is unhindered by corporate restrictions set by one search service?

Give us your thoughts and post a comment.