Meet Joe Easterly

Joe Easterly

Joe Easterly, Milne's Electronic Resources and Digital Scholarship Librarian

With Library service expanding deeper into the realm of digital scholarship – the new Digital Media Lab, open-source publishing, Digital Thoreau, etc. — could a matching librarian be far behind? Of course not, and he has arrived in the person of Joe Easterly, who became Milne’s first Electronic Resources and Digital Scholarship Librarian on October 24.

Joe is here to act as the primary human resource for faculty and students working on (or hoping to begin) scholarly projects with a digital focus. It’s what he’s been doing, more or less, at the University of Buffalo for the last four years where he was a media specialist and coordinator of the Media Resource Center, serving as the Visual Resources librarian to the university’s visual arts faculty. The skills he’s acquired through his coursework (he earned his master’s degree in library science in 2007, with an emphasis in digital media information systems and retrieval) and professional experience will serve him – or, more accurately, the Geneseo campus community – very well.

Among the projects Joe has been involved in is UBdigit, the University of Buffalo’s digital library collection. He managed and directed the Visual Resources Collection portion of that resource, from scanning the images to creating the metadata, working closely with faculty and supervising a team of student assistants. Joe is used to collaborating with faculty, having conducted workshops, developed image digitization standards, facilitated licensing and consignment of digital images, and helped write grants. He also has experience digitizing images for exhibitions and scholarly publication, and he’s done digital preservation consulting for UB Galleries and museum curators in the Buffalo-Niagara region. He was a charter member of UB’s Digital Humanities Initiative. Safe to say, Joe knows his way around the digital scholarship landscape and is prepared to lead others through it.

One of the first projects Joe has joined here at Geneseo is the Digital Thoreau Project, headed by English professor Paul Schacht and other faculty from the English department and Milne Library. Digital Thoreau aims to bring the works of Henry David Thoreau – beginning with a TEI-encoded scholarly edition of Walden – to scholars, students and general readers around the world.

Joe’s ease and expertise with digital technology and his commitment to librarianship are built on a solid humanities foundation. He received a BA in linguistics, has studied French extensively and is currently pursuing a second master’s degree in social anthropology. He is also a classically trained pianist. Lately, he says, he’s “really into” wine and photography, and when the weather’s fine he likes to go sailing.

The folks at Milne are very glad that Joe decided to join the faculty, and the feeling is mutual, he says. “I was really impressed by how committed and talented the library faculty and staff are … it was a big motivation for me to join.” Aesthetics played a (small) part, too, in his decision to come to Geneseo. “I was expecting the dreary early-70s late modernist architecture you sometimes see at [SUNY] campuses,” he says. “I had no idea how beautiful the town is, or the campus, until I came to visit.” Joe is not the only one who is optimistic about his future here at Geneseo, and about the future of digital scholarship.

Kim Davies Hoffman: Profile of a Milne Librarian

Kim Davies Hoffman bringing theory into practice

Kim Davies Hoffman bringing theory into practice

Kim Davies Hoffman is a tireless instruction & reference librarian, a valuable team player, a careful mentor, and, as of last spring, Coordinator of Instruction & Reference Services at Milne Library. Kim has risen through the ranks fairly quickly during her 12 years as a SUNY librarian (nearly all that time at Geneseo) and was promoted to Full Librarian on Sept. 1 this year. Of her professional growth in that time, she says, “There has definitely been a shift from learning and doing to guiding, mentoring and leading.”

With her extensive list of college committee memberships and outreach efforts, it’s a fair bet that Kim is familiar to many people on this campus, especially the faculty and students in the academic departments she serves as liaison – Anthropology, Sociology and Foreign Languages.  She has taught hundreds of information literacy and research skills classes over the years, but perhaps her most important and fulfilling contribution has been in collaborating with individual professors to integrate long-term, intensive and progressive library instruction within their courses. Her collaborators have included Ellen Kintz (Anthropology), Elaine Cleeton (Sociology) and Cristina Rowley (Spanish), to name just a few.

Kim’s professional reputation extends well beyond Geneseo, through the many presentations she has made at local, state and national conferences, as well as through articles she has written (or co-written), committee memberships and positions she has held, and programs she has been instrumental in creating. It is possible to list only a few here.  “My preference for professional committee work is on a local scale, she says.  “I have been able to make much more of an impact on my fellow colleagues and the profession overall than I would serving as a mere number within a larger national organization.”

In the SUNY Librarians Association (SUNYLA),  Kim served  for five years as Chair of Membership Development Committee, from which sprang MEOW (Membership Enthusiasm and Outreach Workgroup) which Kim helped formSUNYLA  logo with a few other librarians who were frustrated with the lack of participation in SUNYLA. She also served as Chair of the Working Group for Information Literacy and in that capacity worked with fellow Milne librarian Michelle Costello to design and host a one-day interactive workshop entitled Library Instruction: Teaching Tips from the Trenches, in January 2009. That workshop led to a similar one hosted at the University of Albany plus a follow-up pre-conference workshop at the SUNYLA annual conference, also in 2009. The program evolved, with the help of a $3,500 grant, into LILAC, the acclaimed Library Instruction Leadership Academy. For their work, Kim and Michelle were recognized by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) with its 2011 Instruction Section (IS) Innovation award.

Kim with LILAC co-creator Michelle Costello

Kim with LILAC co-creator Michelle Costello

Among the several other awards Kim has received are the Friend of SUNYLA award and the (SUNY) Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Librarianship.

So where did she come from?  Shortly after she was born, in England, Kim and her family moved to Canada where she lived for the next ten years before moving permanently to the U.S. (she has dual British-U.S. citizenship). She has lived for two years in France, as well – studying abroad in Dijon for a year, and, soon after, for another year as a teaching assistant in Paris. She earned a BA in French and International Affairs from the University of New Hampshire and, after receiving an MLS from the University of Buffalo in 1997, took off for New Orleans, working first in the public library system and then at the University of New Orleans.  When NOLA’s heat and humidity drove her back north, Kim found a part-time librarian position at SUNY Fredonia (which she supplemented as a barista at Starbucks), until she landed a full-time job as a librarian at UB’s Health Sciences Library. By late summer 1999 Kim was hired by Milne Library as a reference & instruction (with a side of government documents) librarian.  She hit the ground running and hasn’t slowed down since.

As for where she is going from here, her priorities lay, as usual, with finding new and creative ways to increase information literacy among the students – and faculty – at Geneseo, in an increasingly online world.  As Coordinator of Instruction & Reference Service, she will work to refine assessment of the library’s instruction program, not only to prove what she and many others already know – that it IS effective – but to enable it to become even better.  And plans are well underway for LILAC2, which will help empower a fresh crop of new library instructors to “teach it forward.” Citing a commitment to lead by example as one of her greatest strengths, Kim says “The opportunity to co-teach with novice librarians allows me to share my understanding of pedagogical theory and practice without appearing lofty and without exposing their insecurity or uncertainty about teaching.”  She adds, “My fearlessness in the classroom opens the door for others to experiment with new ideas and technology.”

Resources for Education Majors

Public Libraries can be a great resource for Geneseo education students looking for material to supplement lesson plans.  Their collections include picture books, classics, chapter books and non fiction material, and a youth services librarian can often provide lists of material grouped by subject.  For example, if you needed fiction books about outer space for various grade levels, a librarian could provide you with a list of appropriate books.  Below, books about outer space are arranged into three categories:  picture books (for the youngest readers), easy reads (for early grade schoolers) and chapter books (for older children/young teens).
Outer Space Stencils by The Bunny Maker provided by the Flickr Creative Commons Image Search

Outer Space Stencils by The Bunny Maker provided by the Flickr Creative Commons Image Search

Picture Books about Space (Young Children)

Stella to Earth by Simon Puttock

Astronauts are Sleeping by Natalie Standiford
While spinning through space, three astronauts dream of life on earth.

Stella to Earth by Simon Puttock
Before Stella’s father comes in to tell her a bedtime story, Stella takes a little trip in a spaceship.

Hare and Tortoise Race to the Moon by Oliver J. Corwin
Best friends Tortoise and Hare compete to see who will be first to reach the moon.

Harry and Horsie by Katie Van Camp
Harry sneaks out of bed one night with his best friend, Horsie. Bubbles fill Harry’s room and begin carrying items into space. Can Harry find Horsie?

I’ll Catch the Moon by Nina Crews
A child imagines going into outer space, catching the moon, and taking it on an around-the-world adventure.

Joey and Jet in Space by James Yang
When Jet runs away, he could be anywhere, maybe even outer space.

Moon Ball by Jane Yolen


Moon Ball
 by Jane Yolen

Danny always strikes out, but in a dream he plays baseball with the moon and stars and finds it an eminently satisfying experience.

Space Boy by Leo Landry
Having decided not to go to bed because his home is too noisy, Nicholas flies his spaceship to the Moon, where he enjoys a snack, takes a moonwalk, and enjoys the quiet–until he realizes  what he is missing at home.

The Way Back Home by Oliver Jeffers
Stranded on the moon after his extraordinary airplane takes him into outer space, a boy meets a marooned young Martian with a broken spacecraft, and the two new friends work together to return to their respective homes.

Zoom! Zoom! Zoom! I’m off to the Moon by Dan Yaccarino
A boy gets in a spaceship and takes a dangerous but exciting trip to the moon.

Easy Reads about Space (Early Grade School)

Doodle Dog in Space by Eric Seltzer
Doodle Dog, a talented artist, comes to the rescue of his less artistic friends.

Let Me Off This Spaceship! by Gery Greer
When Tod and Billy are kidnapped by creatures from outer space, they try to make as much trouble as they can on board ship so that the spaceship captain will take them back to Earth.

Space Cat by Doug Cushman

Space Cat by Doug Cushman
When Space Cat and Earl the robot encounter trouble with their space ship, they crash-land on an alien planet to search for more fuel.

Space Guys! by Martha Weston
A boy is visited by beings that look like robots that arrive in a flying saucer from outer space.

Jed and the Space Bandits by Jean Marzollo
Jed’s Junior Space Patrol helps Molly, a girl who can turn invisible, to rescue her parents from bandits.

Alien & Possum: Friends No Matter What by Tony Johnston
Possum and Alien become friends and find that they have both similarities and differences.

Astronaut Piggy Wiggy by Christyan Fox
A little pig imagines what it would be like to be a daring astronaut.

Chapter Books about Space (Grade 5 & up)

Cosmic by Frank Cottrell Boyce
Super-sized, eleven-year-old Liam makes a giant leap for boy-kind by competing with a group of adults for the chance to go into space.

George’s Cosmic Treasure Hunt by Lucy Hawking
George is heartbroken when his neighbor Annie and her space-scientist father move to Florida, but when Annie sends him a secret message telling him she has been contacted by aliens with a terrible warning, he joins her in a galaxy-wide search for answers. Includes scientific essays on space travel.

Chilling with the Great Ones by Dan Greenburg


One Small Step
 by Philip Kerr

In 1969 Houston, Texas, thirteen-year-old Scott learns to fly from his father, an Air Force flight instructor, but when NASA needs him for a secret space mission, Scott’s elation is tempered by concern that his mother, who has moved to Florida, will find out.

Chilling with the Great Ones by Dan Greenburg
When siblings Klatu, Lek, and Ploo from the planet Loogl return to the mysterious Area 51 to recover their wrecked spaceship, they meet the Great Ones–four legendary Looglings who crashed in Roswell fifty years earlier. Klatu, Lek, and Ploo head back to Groom Lake to fix their busted spaceship. But the spaceship is gone–it’s been taken to Area 51. There’s nothing for the aliens to do other than sneak in and search for it. Instead they find something they weren’t looking for–the Great Ones! The mythic missing Looglians Org, Murkel, Shemp, and Kurth crashed at Roswell New Mexico in 1947, and have been in the deep freeze ever since. Can our three wacky alien kids rescue them?

I Left My Sneakers in Dimension X by Bruce Coville
Rod and his bratty cousin Elspeth are snatched into another dimension by the monstrous alien Smorkus Flinders.

The True Meaning of Smekday by Adam Rex

The True Meaning of Smekday by Adam Rex
When her mother is abducted by aliens on Christmas Eve (or “Smekday” Eve since the Boov Invasion), 11 year-old Tip hops in the family car and heads south to find her and meets an alien Boov mechanic who agrees to help her and save the planet from disaster.

The War of the Worlds by Chris Sasaki
An abridged version of H. G. Wells’ classic science fiction tale in which, as life on Mars becomes impossible, Martians and their terrifying machines invade the Earth.

Brandon Priddy

Brandon Priddy

-Brandon Priddy

*Image: Outer Space Stencils by The Bunny Maker provided by the Flickr Creative Commons Image Search

Ed Rivenburgh Awarded National Recognition for IDS Project Work

Former Milne Library Director Ed Rivenburgh is the winner of the 2011 Virginia Boucher/OCLC Distinguished ILL Librarian Award, a recognition of his vision and efforts in creating an improved system of resource sharing among libraries in New York State.  The IDS (Information Delivery Services) Project, whose aim is to increase efficiencies in interlibrary loan, has become a model for libraries throughout the state and nation.

Since his retirement from SUNY Geneseo in December, Ed has been able to devote even more of his time, talent and energy to his position as IDS Project Director.  He will receive the award at a ceremony this June during the American Library Association’s annual conference in New Orleans. Read the full story here.

Science Librarian Bonnie Swoger on Maternity Leave

Bonnie Swoger

From now until about mid-June, Milne Library and the Geneseo campus community will have to excuse Bonnie Swoger while she leaves to have a baby and to attend to all that comes with the momentous event.  It’s not like Bonnie hasn’t done this before — this is her second child — but she would like everyone to know that there are people and resources that can help out in her absence.

For book purchases, journal subscriptions and databases questions relating to the sciences, folks can contact Kate Pitcher (pitcher@geneseo.edu or 245-5064); questions concerning IDS, or Information Delivery Services, can be directed to Tim Bowersox (bowersox@geneseo.edu or 245-5589); and Kim Hoffman (kdhoffman@geneseo.edu or 245-5046) is the librarian to contact with questions or requests for science-related library instruction.

Of course, Library Guides  are also available for the sciences Bonnie covers — Biology, Chemistry, Geosciences, Physics & Astronomy, Mathematics and Computer Science.  Students and others needing research assistance can always request a research consultation or simply stop by the service desk and ask to speak to a reference librarian.

The entire staff at Milne Library wishes Bonnie and her growing family a happy, healthy and restful (?) time!

Librarians Hoffman and Costello Earn Prestigious ACRL Award

Kim and Michelle at LILAC

Kim Davies Hoffman, left, and Michelle Costello

The Association of College and Research Libraries has selected Milne Instruction Librarians Kimberly Davies Hoffman and Michelle Costello to receive its 2011 Instruction Section (IS) Innovation award for their work in developing the Library Instruction Leadership Academy (LILAC). The award is given each year in recognition of a project demonstrating “creative, innovative or unique approaches to information literacy instruction or programming.”

The LILAC project, which ran from January through May 2010, was a regional effort that provided intensive training, observational experiences, reflection through writing, and teaching practice to K-12, community and college/university librarians.

Hoffman and Costello will receive a certificate and $3000 prize at the the American Library Association’s annual conference this summer in New Orleans.

 

 

We bid adieu to three excellent librarians

Barbara Clarke, Donna Howe, Paul MacLean and Diane Johnson

When you stepped into Milne Library this semester, did you notice something missing?  Three of our librarians are retiring, having logged their last days at Milne before the year’s end.  They represent, collectively, 100 years of exeperience at SUNY Geneseo — Barbara Clarke, the Head of Milne’s Teacher Education Resource Center, retiring after 35 years here; Paul MacLean, Head of Information Technology Services, 31 years; and Diane Johnson, Head of Serials, 34 years.  Donna Howe, Secretary to the Library Director, also retired last semester but has returned to Milne on a part-time basis until May.

Be assured that, while Barbara, Paul and Diane and all their excellent work will be missed, the folks at Milne are endeavoring to transition as smoothly as possible and will continue to provide the same high level of service our users expect and appreciate.

To read more about these librarians’ careers and retirement plans, see the front-page article of the Fall 2010 Milne Library Infobits .

Library Instruction Leadership Academy (LILAC)

The Library Instruction Leadership Academy (LILAC),collaboratively developed by Rochester-area librarians with Milne Library at the forefront, recently held its third workshop, exploring topics such as multiple intelligence and learning styles and “teacher as performer.” Judging from participants’ reactions it was a huge success! Remaining workshops include “teaching with technology,” classroom management and assessment.

LILAC is a semester-long intensive learning experience geared towards librarians new to instruction that includes a variety of workshops, field observations, assigned readings, reflection, discussions, and a final instruction project. Each workshop focuses on an aspect of library instruction and involves a mixture of pedagogical theory, best practices and hands on experience.

Participants will reflect upon what they have learned throughout the semester and then “teach it forward” by completing a final project. These projects range from starting an information literacy program for homed schooled children to presenting workshops at an upcoming library conference. The Academy runs until May 2010 and culminates with a graduation party where participants will showcase their final projects.

Click on the image thumbnail for a larger view.

Geneseo Distinguished Educator Awards nominations due

The Ella Cline Shear School of Education has established the Geneseo Distinguished Educator Awards to recognize outstanding alumni educators, including librarians, who have made a profound impact on individual students, schools and communities. With over 13,000 educator alumni, Geneseo graduates make a difference throughout New York State and the entire nation.

Who is eligible: SUNY Geneseo graduates who work or have worked as a teacher, guidance counselor, school psychiatrist, librarian, administrator or staff member who impacts the daily lives and educational experiences of K-12 students. The awards may be conferred upon retired educators or posthumously.

Who may nominate: Superintendents, principals, vice principals, deans or department chairs (may nominate up to two qualifying education professionals per year).

Deadline: Nominations must be postmarked by March 23, 2010. Click here to download nomination instructions and form.

Award recipients will be honored at a complimentary champagne reception under the tent at Summer Reunion 2010.

Learning about Mobile Library Services

Several Milne Librarians interested in using mobile technology for the Library took part in this year’s Handheld Librarian II Online Conference February 17th and 18th.

Topics ranged from trends and “social reference” (and how libraries fit into it) to “iPhone/Mobile Applications for Digital Library” to building a mobile site to mobile tagging, including QR codes and were included in topic tracks for Mobile Reference Service, E-readers, Mobile Apps, Marketing, Websites, and Content for Library Mobile Sites.

You can see what some other schools and organizations are doing with their mobile sites, including Duke University, Northwestern University, International Children’s Digital Library (ICDL), and London’s National Gallery.

Currently Milne offers very basic access through our Milne Library Mobile page. Have you used the mobile page? What was your experience like? If Milne were to offer extended mobile services, would you use them? If so, what would be the kinds of information and services you’d like to have access to through your cell phone? Tell us in the comments!