Tips for Surviving Mid-terms

The fall 2011 semester is flying by and mid-term exams are nearly upon us.  Here’s a few tips for making it through successfully.

  1. Plan ahead so that you give yourself plenty of time to study.  Limit your extracurricular activities the week before your big tests.
  2. Study in chunks.  Block off specific hours of your schedule to study for each test you have to take. A ten minute study break every few hours is also a good idea.
  3.  Schedule in some exercise.  There’s no better way to relieve stress.  Don’t plan on studying non-stop the whole week.
  4. Take advantage of study groups.  A group can motivate you to get started and discussing difficult concepts with each other can aid in understanding.
  5. Take advantage of review sessions.  Most professors will touch on certain topics more heavily than others in review sessions and this might give you a better idea of what will be on the exam.
  6. Take advantage of your professor’s office hours.  If you’re unsure about anything, touch base with your professor or TA.
  7. Make sure you have the materials you’ll need for the test the night before.  Bring a back-up pen or pencil.
  8. Get a good night’s rest  and have a good breakfast before your test.  If you follow tip #1, you won’t have to stay up all night cramming.
  9. Don’t wait until your class is about to begin to get a bluebook.  If you need a blue book, you can pick it up at the Library Service Desk for 15 cents.
  10. Don’t psych yourself out.  You’ve studied, so don’t talk yourself into doing poorly.  Put yourself in confidence mode, visualize it all going right and think A+.

Resources for Education Majors

Public Libraries can be a great resource for Geneseo education students looking for material to supplement lesson plans.  Their collections include picture books, classics, chapter books and non fiction material, and a youth services librarian can often provide lists of material grouped by subject.  For example, if you needed fiction books about outer space for various grade levels, a librarian could provide you with a list of appropriate books.  Below, books about outer space are arranged into three categories:  picture books (for the youngest readers), easy reads (for early grade schoolers) and chapter books (for older children/young teens).
Outer Space Stencils by The Bunny Maker provided by the Flickr Creative Commons Image Search

Outer Space Stencils by The Bunny Maker provided by the Flickr Creative Commons Image Search

Picture Books about Space (Young Children)

Stella to Earth by Simon Puttock

Astronauts are Sleeping by Natalie Standiford
While spinning through space, three astronauts dream of life on earth.

Stella to Earth by Simon Puttock
Before Stella’s father comes in to tell her a bedtime story, Stella takes a little trip in a spaceship.

Hare and Tortoise Race to the Moon by Oliver J. Corwin
Best friends Tortoise and Hare compete to see who will be first to reach the moon.

Harry and Horsie by Katie Van Camp
Harry sneaks out of bed one night with his best friend, Horsie. Bubbles fill Harry’s room and begin carrying items into space. Can Harry find Horsie?

I’ll Catch the Moon by Nina Crews
A child imagines going into outer space, catching the moon, and taking it on an around-the-world adventure.

Joey and Jet in Space by James Yang
When Jet runs away, he could be anywhere, maybe even outer space.

Moon Ball by Jane Yolen


Moon Ball
 by Jane Yolen

Danny always strikes out, but in a dream he plays baseball with the moon and stars and finds it an eminently satisfying experience.

Space Boy by Leo Landry
Having decided not to go to bed because his home is too noisy, Nicholas flies his spaceship to the Moon, where he enjoys a snack, takes a moonwalk, and enjoys the quiet–until he realizes  what he is missing at home.

The Way Back Home by Oliver Jeffers
Stranded on the moon after his extraordinary airplane takes him into outer space, a boy meets a marooned young Martian with a broken spacecraft, and the two new friends work together to return to their respective homes.

Zoom! Zoom! Zoom! I’m off to the Moon by Dan Yaccarino
A boy gets in a spaceship and takes a dangerous but exciting trip to the moon.

Easy Reads about Space (Early Grade School)

Doodle Dog in Space by Eric Seltzer
Doodle Dog, a talented artist, comes to the rescue of his less artistic friends.

Let Me Off This Spaceship! by Gery Greer
When Tod and Billy are kidnapped by creatures from outer space, they try to make as much trouble as they can on board ship so that the spaceship captain will take them back to Earth.

Space Cat by Doug Cushman

Space Cat by Doug Cushman
When Space Cat and Earl the robot encounter trouble with their space ship, they crash-land on an alien planet to search for more fuel.

Space Guys! by Martha Weston
A boy is visited by beings that look like robots that arrive in a flying saucer from outer space.

Jed and the Space Bandits by Jean Marzollo
Jed’s Junior Space Patrol helps Molly, a girl who can turn invisible, to rescue her parents from bandits.

Alien & Possum: Friends No Matter What by Tony Johnston
Possum and Alien become friends and find that they have both similarities and differences.

Astronaut Piggy Wiggy by Christyan Fox
A little pig imagines what it would be like to be a daring astronaut.

Chapter Books about Space (Grade 5 & up)

Cosmic by Frank Cottrell Boyce
Super-sized, eleven-year-old Liam makes a giant leap for boy-kind by competing with a group of adults for the chance to go into space.

George’s Cosmic Treasure Hunt by Lucy Hawking
George is heartbroken when his neighbor Annie and her space-scientist father move to Florida, but when Annie sends him a secret message telling him she has been contacted by aliens with a terrible warning, he joins her in a galaxy-wide search for answers. Includes scientific essays on space travel.

Chilling with the Great Ones by Dan Greenburg


One Small Step
 by Philip Kerr

In 1969 Houston, Texas, thirteen-year-old Scott learns to fly from his father, an Air Force flight instructor, but when NASA needs him for a secret space mission, Scott’s elation is tempered by concern that his mother, who has moved to Florida, will find out.

Chilling with the Great Ones by Dan Greenburg
When siblings Klatu, Lek, and Ploo from the planet Loogl return to the mysterious Area 51 to recover their wrecked spaceship, they meet the Great Ones–four legendary Looglings who crashed in Roswell fifty years earlier. Klatu, Lek, and Ploo head back to Groom Lake to fix their busted spaceship. But the spaceship is gone–it’s been taken to Area 51. There’s nothing for the aliens to do other than sneak in and search for it. Instead they find something they weren’t looking for–the Great Ones! The mythic missing Looglians Org, Murkel, Shemp, and Kurth crashed at Roswell New Mexico in 1947, and have been in the deep freeze ever since. Can our three wacky alien kids rescue them?

I Left My Sneakers in Dimension X by Bruce Coville
Rod and his bratty cousin Elspeth are snatched into another dimension by the monstrous alien Smorkus Flinders.

The True Meaning of Smekday by Adam Rex

The True Meaning of Smekday by Adam Rex
When her mother is abducted by aliens on Christmas Eve (or “Smekday” Eve since the Boov Invasion), 11 year-old Tip hops in the family car and heads south to find her and meets an alien Boov mechanic who agrees to help her and save the planet from disaster.

The War of the Worlds by Chris Sasaki
An abridged version of H. G. Wells’ classic science fiction tale in which, as life on Mars becomes impossible, Martians and their terrifying machines invade the Earth.

Brandon Priddy

Brandon Priddy

-Brandon Priddy

*Image: Outer Space Stencils by The Bunny Maker provided by the Flickr Creative Commons Image Search

Just an end-of-the-semester reminder… avoid being a victim of theft.

Petty thefts tend to increase at the end of the semester.  Please do not step away from your valuables, even for short trips to the copier, printer, or restroom.   Unattended laptops, text books, Campus IDs, and bags attract thieves.  Since book buy-back occurs soon, securing your textbooks is especially critical.

Take your belongings with you or have a friend watch them while you’re gone.

Advice for new students from the "blogosphere"

At the beginning of the school year, the web is full of free advice for new college students. Some of it may be useful, some of it may be wrong, and some of it may just be funny. But there certainly is an awful lot out there:

Financial advice

Protect your personal information:
Keep your ATM, credit card and checking account numbers to yourself. A paper shredder is a good investment for disposing of financial records properly.

Social advice

I’m a freshman at college this year, and I’m worried about balancing parties and homework. I promised my parents that I’d try my hardest to make the Dean’s List, but I also want to have fun now that I’m at college. Any suggestions?

Academic advice

Note-taking is one of those skills that rarely gets taught. Teachers and professors assume either that taking good notes comes naturally or that someone else must have already taught students how to take notes. Then we sit around and complain that our students don’t know how to take notes.

Of course, since October Break is this weekend, you’ve probably been here long enough to have some advice of your own to give. Any thoughts about what you wish you knew when you first arrived at Geneseo?

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